People smugglers: Europe criminal network vs Vietnamese Communist

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UK: 39 dead bodies found inside a truck container in Essex – 23/10/2019

<<Facts, pictures and video clips related to this story – The horrible deaths of 39 Vietnamese migrants in a refrigerated truck in Essex, England>>

For several days, I have been reading news about the death of 39 people smuggled into Britain on a refrigerated truck. It touched my heart as at this moment, 25 (and probably more) of those dead were identified as Vietnamese who came from the same impoverished coastal region of North Vietnam.

The victims had paid between £8,000 to £30,000 by their families to be smuggled and started their journey from Vietnam to China, then Germany or France and finally in Belgium to board the deadly refrigerated trailer.

“The victims were discovered naked, or with minimal clothing, and had been desperately ‘banging on the doors’ for help and had ‘foam coming from their mouths’.“

Dreams of a better life: Faces of the migrants who died in truck tragedy while trying to enter UK – as it emerges 25 of the 39 victims were from the same Vietnamese village. – Daily Mail – by Jemma Carr, Abul Taher and Holly Bancroft – Sunday 27 October 2019.

An ex-refugee who had experienced almost suffocated in the back of a shipping container during his journey to England expressed his insight into the people smugglers:

““They don’t see you as a human being. They see you as a commodity, as money, as an object, and this is it,” he said.

“Never, ever, trust them. I mean, I had to put my faith in them and I regretted it.””

Ex-refugee recalls his own terrifying experience of being smuggled in a truck after Essex lorry tragedy – by Associated Press – Sunday Oct 27 2019.

But wait there’s more!

Love Paradise – Love Hell’s related information

<<Story related to the information>>

Vietnamese-American women place strict rules on men returning to homeland – written – By JOHN BOUDREAU | Mercury News, Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: November 5, 2011 at 5:03 pm | UPDATED: August 13, 2016 at 1:47 pm (link to the article)

Photo by Jim Gensheimer/San Jose Mercury News. 2/2000. –VIETNAM– The bar scene in Ho Chi Minh City is complete with women wearing scant outfits. Right after the war, this kind of dress would have been cause for imprisonment. As Vietnam opened up to the West in the early nineties, dress codes were relaxed.

US sailors of the visiting USS Curtis Wilbur drink and chat with Vietnamese women at a bar inside a dancing in downtown Da Nang on 29 July 2004. The Arleigh Buirke class guided missile destroyer is on the second port call by an American military vessel since the Vietnam War ended three decades ago. The 342-strong crew of the ship will spend six days in the city where US Marines landed in March 1965, becoming the first American combat troops in Vietnam. (Photo credit should read HOANG DINH NAM/AFP/Getty Images)

HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam — The trouble for Henry Liem begins every time he prepares to return to his homeland.

Getting the required visa from the Vietnamese government is a breeze. It’s the “second visa” — from his wife worried that he will stray over there — that requires diplomatic skills.

“My wife is always cranky every time I go,” said Liem, a philosophy instructor at San Jose City College who visits Vietnam twice a year to teach at a university. “So I rarely disclose my upcoming trip until the last minute. It’s pain minimization. The longer she knows, the longer I have to bear the pain.”

Thirty-six years after the Vietnam War ended, Communist government officials openly welcome Vietnamese-Americans back, even those who fought against them. But another Civil War has erupted, this one pitting Vietnamese-American women against their husbands and boyfriends who want to return to the Southeast Asian country. The men’s significant others contend that Vietnamese women lie in wait to ambush them, often eager for the financial stability such a match would bring.

“All the girls in Vietnam are aggressive. They attack!” said Ha Tien, 38, who owns an accounting business in San Jose. She said she lost her man to such a love guerrilla a few years ago.

But wait there’s more!

My noble, widowed grandmother

Amongst the people in Grandpa's funeral procession were two pregnant women - Grandma with her tenth child and my mum with her first child.

Amongst the people in Grandpa’s funeral procession were two pregnant women – Grandma with her tenth child and my mum with her first child.

Comments about this post on ABC Open 500 words – Grandparents

I certainly wasn’t my maternal grandmother’s favourite grandchild, however my grandmother received my deepest admiration and greatest affection for her.

My fondest memory of her was her smile. That smile made a child like me felt that I was bathed in love, appreciated and accepted for being myself. Her smile satisfied my longing for tenderness and approval that my parents rarely expressed towards their children. But wait there’s more!

Family, reasons and love

I had to choose between my own safety and my family. I chose my family. (Picture owned by Timothy D. Timothy D at the BOQ (Bachelor Officer Quarter) room of the Fort Monmouth Signals School, New Jersey, USA in 1973.)

I had to choose between my own safety and my family. I chose my family. (Picture owned by Timothy D. Timothy D at the BOQ (Bachelor Officer Quarter) room of the Fort Monmouth Signals School, New Jersey, USA in 1973.)

Comments about this post on ABC Open 500 words – Things we do for love.

30/04/1975, the day I lost my country, my identity as a soldier, and was torn between my own safety and my family.

I was Lieutenant Colonel working at J6 Joint General Staff (Signal Communications) – Headquarters.

I applied for family evacuation, reserved for high-ranking officers through the American Advisory Group. But wait there’s more!