Love Paradise – Love Hell’s related information

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Vietnamese-American women place strict rules on men returning to homeland – written – By JOHN BOUDREAU | Mercury News, Bay Area News Group
PUBLISHED: November 5, 2011 at 5:03 pm | UPDATED: August 13, 2016 at 1:47 pm (link to the article)

Photo by Jim Gensheimer/San Jose Mercury News. 2/2000. –VIETNAM– The bar scene in Ho Chi Minh City is complete with women wearing scant outfits. Right after the war, this kind of dress would have been cause for imprisonment. As Vietnam opened up to the West in the early nineties, dress codes were relaxed.

US sailors of the visiting USS Curtis Wilbur drink and chat with Vietnamese women at a bar inside a dancing in downtown Da Nang on 29 July 2004. The Arleigh Buirke class guided missile destroyer is on the second port call by an American military vessel since the Vietnam War ended three decades ago. The 342-strong crew of the ship will spend six days in the city where US Marines landed in March 1965, becoming the first American combat troops in Vietnam. (Photo credit should read HOANG DINH NAM/AFP/Getty Images)

HO CHI MINH CITY, Vietnam — The trouble for Henry Liem begins every time he prepares to return to his homeland.

Getting the required visa from the Vietnamese government is a breeze. It’s the “second visa” — from his wife worried that he will stray over there — that requires diplomatic skills.

“My wife is always cranky every time I go,” said Liem, a philosophy instructor at San Jose City College who visits Vietnam twice a year to teach at a university. “So I rarely disclose my upcoming trip until the last minute. It’s pain minimization. The longer she knows, the longer I have to bear the pain.”

Thirty-six years after the Vietnam War ended, Communist government officials openly welcome Vietnamese-Americans back, even those who fought against them. But another Civil War has erupted, this one pitting Vietnamese-American women against their husbands and boyfriends who want to return to the Southeast Asian country. The men’s significant others contend that Vietnamese women lie in wait to ambush them, often eager for the financial stability such a match would bring.

“All the girls in Vietnam are aggressive. They attack!” said Ha Tien, 38, who owns an accounting business in San Jose. She said she lost her man to such a love guerrilla a few years ago.

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The White Magic Wand

I wish I had a magic wand so I could turn myself into a white person and then indulge in my hobby.

I wish I had a magic wand so I could turn myself into a white person and then indulge in my hobby.

Comments about this post on ABC Open 500 words – My other life.

AVT was a famous band in Vietnam. It was formed in 1958 to entertain servicemen and its name was made up from the initials of the three original band members who were political warfare recruits of the South Vietnam Army. The band disassembled when one member committed suicide on the fall of Saigon and another was evacuated to America, leaving one in Vietnam.

I loved listening to AVT’s satirical songs, where the members represented three regions of Vietnam dressed in different regional costumes, spoke in different dialects, played a mix of modern and classical regional music on traditional instruments.

In their song ‘The History of Hair’, they observed the way Saigon unstylishly copied the hair styles of Western film stars. The waving and receding hairstyle of American Robert Taylor was imitated, but looked more like ‘cow horns’. Brigitte Bardot’s hair was reproduced but resembled a bird nest. Gina Lollobrigida’s ‘frisé'(curly) style was replicated but appeared like a big hair ball. Women dyed their hair blonde to be like Marilyn Monroe and men who worshipped Yul Brynner shaved their heads. But wait there’s more!

The White Magic Wand poem

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(Spanish-Quintilla-style poem)

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Lights on, curtains up, stage alive,
Shakespeare, Molière, Jane Austen,
Your characters all now arrive,
They steal the limelight with action,
They bring the past back to revive.

Shakespeare, Molière, Jane Austen,
Parts of myself are in your plays,
Is it ok? Will you reckon?
Your characters, I can portray,
Even though my face is Asian.

Image credit
by Christopher Marrast.

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The chopsticks battle

After living in Australia for a while, I am ready to leave my chopsticks culture behind.

After living in Australia for a while, I am ready to leave my chopsticks culture behind.

Comments about this post on ABC Open 500 words – I quit

He bit on the boiled chicken piece, then put it back onto the communal plate and picked another. I was 8 years old then and he was a visiting elder; even my parents wouldn’t dare to confront him. Since then I couldn’t stop thinking about the disgusting saliva that the elder left on the chicken piece. But wait there’s more!

The glare of racism!

I have come to accept racism in this country in exchange for freedom after escaping from the Vietnamese Communists.

I have come to accept racism in this country in exchange for freedom after escaping from the Vietnamese Communists.

Comments about this post on ABC Open DRUM – Casual Racism.

Arriving in Australia from a Malaysian refugee camp in April 1984, I stayed at a six-bedroom parish house in Burwood, Victoria together with thirteen other Vietnamese refugees. On Christmas Day that year, when I was alone in the house, the parish priest took me along to an Australian parishioner’s house and I had my very first Australian Christmas lunch there. It was a frosty lunch as no one spoke a word to me. More than thirty years later, I still wonder why those Australians were cold to me. But wait therre’s more!